R[E]D – Research : Emotion : Design

A Brand Research and Development Strategy Firm


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Understanding, the Bridge Builder Between a Company and Its Audience

Pulling from logo warehouses or crowdsourcing design may sound tremendously appealing for filling in the blank spot on the top of your letterhead.

You want something trendy and cool, even if it’s just to check off a task on your to-do list.

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It doesn’t make sense for a company to use a logo that has an immense lack of understanding. A logo alone isn’t the solution to developing a strong brand. Strength comes from understanding company culture, which is a giant part of a larger brand strategy. Understanding provides an opportunity to develop cohesive and consistent messaging. This requires customization, knowledge and skill. RED has acquired all the skills needed to build you a solid foundation that is not hollow and inauthentic.

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Do You Need a Style Guide? Answer: Yes

It’s a simple question: Do you need a style guide? And it has a simple answer: Yes. Any brand, company, blog or webpage that wants to create and maintain consistency and a professional feel should have a style guide.

Style guides are a must for any publisher with multiple employees. This is especially important if more than one person will work on any brand elements (from the website to printed materials), and to ensure that transitions between employees are seamless in the eyes of users. Today, we take a look at well-documented style guide from MailChimp, and highlight things you can take away in creating your own document for the first time.

What Is a Style Guide?

 mailchimp-release

A style guide is the ultimate resource for visual and writing tone for your brand. The guidebook is not intended to be read cover to cover (and should not be written that way), and should be organized as a simple resource manual.

Style guides cover two big areas: visuals and writing. For website or app development, a style guide may contain a third area, defining how the user interface should work or coding specifics.

A style guide is a fluid document and once written should be updated regularly. When creating this document, consider how it will look and be used during the process. Your style guide should follow the styles defined. Use your brand’s color palette and the same writing style that you would like to be associated with the brand.

MailChimp’s “Voice and Tone” style guide follows this concept. The tone is simple and the guide looks and feels like the website. In addition, MailChimp also has a “Brand Assets” guide for how visual elements are used.

Getting Started

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Creating a style guide from scratch is not a task that you can complete in an hour. It will take some planning and time. But once the document is created and if updated regularly, it can be a time-saver in the long run. Before you write the first word of instruction, gather (or create) this list of materials to make compiling your guide that much easier.

Branding definitions, styles and logotypes: This includes examples of how logos can and can’t be used, as well as fonts, sizes and color swatches.

Font palette: List all the typefaces, sizes and colors that are acceptable. Include specs for how each is used from styles for body type, headers, quotes, labels, captions, navigation elements and so on.

Images, icons and buttons: Define style, color, size and placement of each.

Styles for forms or calls to action: Define what type of information can be collected and how data collection works. Write and include disclaimer information.

Basic layout: What is the basic template for your design? Include a few examples for how your letterhead, printed materials or web pages should look.

Visual Style

 

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mailchimp-color

The visuals section of the style guide includes several key parts: acceptable fonts and use, including normal, bold, italic and special styles; color and size for typefaces; settings for bullets or lists; color palette; and image guidelines, such as size, border specs and uses such as text wrap or image and text combinations.

These styles should be written in simple and clear language and include technical specs, such as complete font names, color mix swatches (in RGB, CMYK or Pantone) and usage guidelines for web and print (if applicable). Some brands have both a print and web style guide; other brands opt for one document that covers both.

mailchimp-type

MailChimp’s style for typography is direct and shows each font and usage. The style guide should include HTML specs as well for website styles. What elements use an H1 versus H2 versus H3 tag. (We’ll go into more detail about web specifics in the HMTL section.)

In addition, visual style guidelines should include a full description of when, how and where branding and logos can be used. This includes how the logo looks, if colors or fonts can be altered (typically not) and in what instances use is acceptable.

Writing Style

mailchimp-voice

Just as important as your visual style is the tone of the writing. It can be jarring for users to come see your brand material and it read light and silly in one instance and cold and sterile in another. How the words come together can help clients or users associated with your products, making a writing style vital.

Key parts of written style include tone; spelling and language; reader level or jargon; voice; structure; use of symbols, numbers and lists; branding or trademark usage; and overriding style guide of choice.

There are a handful of generally accepted written style guides for English-language publications. Most company style guides direct you to use one of these for questions on matters of usage and style.

AP Style: The Associated Press Stylebook is used by journalism and writing professionals in print and online. The style focuses on consistency and brevity and is common because of these attributes.

Chicago Style: The Chicago Manual of Style is used by academics and for scholarly works, businesses and includes the basics for a more formal style of writing.

MLA Style: The Modern languages Association style guide is most commonly used in academics, liberal arts and humanities.

MailChimp’s writing style guide includes great examples of press releases and how the site should read as well as how the brand interacts with customers on social media, the blog and how the company’s trademark jokes should be handled.

User Interface and HTML

PRL

If you are creating content for the web, you need rules for digital publication as well. While text, color and tone guidelines will be outlined in other guides, you should also note how the website and user interface should work. (The PRL guide is an excellent resource.)

Text: Explain HTML markup rules. What type of headers are used and how? What’s the difference in usage between an H2 or H3? In addition to usage, what markup does your site use? This is the part of the guide that details every usage.

Images: The rules for image use should be just as clear as for text. Do you have a specified width or height for every image? Is there a standard text wrap or border size? How should alt tags be used. Make sure to answer each of these questions clearly.

Naming and saving files: In addition to how things should look, consider a little web housekeeping. How should files be named and saved in the CMS? Set clear guidelines so that your file maintenance is clean and files are saved at manageable sizes and are easy to find.

Coding practices: Determine and set forth coding standards for HTML, CSS and JavaScript. Include examples.

User Interface: If you did not include a visual guide for user interface elements and workings, include it here. What types of inputs are used and how are they labeled? (Do you use words like “Continue,” “Submit,” or “OK?”) Include a “kit” of your site’s user interface elements and usage.

In Conclusion

 

The best way to get started with creating a must have style guide is to contact:

brand research and development

Go ahead. Request a free evaluation!

Original Author / Carrie Cousins
Original Source / Design Shack

 

 

 


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Apps have grown into being an integral part of your brand | A Collection of Beautiful App Icons

When you’re designing an iPhone, Android or other mobile app – it’s easy to spend all your time focusing on the UI and the software itself, and then leave the app icon to last. It’s important to remember, however, that the app icon will be seen more often than the app itself. It’s on the user’s home screen, and may well be seen many times throughout the day. The app icon in this respect becomes an integral part of your brand – almost like your logo – as it’s what comes to define your app.

Creating a beautifully designed app icon often takes time and energy – and I’d recommend putting in as much time as you would with a logo. Despite it’s small size, it has a big impact and deserves to be crafted carefully. Beautifully designed app icons can take on any form or style – from elegant black and white icons to colourful and brash, but one thing to keep in mind is that simpler is often better. A simple and uncluttered icon can be easier to digest than a busy, visually noisy icon – especially because it’ll be displayed amongst a collection of other icons and will need to stand out and be instantly recognisable.

To help give you some inspiration, I wanted to bring together a collection of some fresh, interesting, innovating and beautifully designed app icons. Some of these designs fall on the side of minimalism, while others are more intricate – but each one of these designs has a certain charm and personality behind them, and each would look at home on even the most design-focused user’s phone. Hopefully these app icons will give you something to think about for the next time you need to create an icon, and that you’ll find some designs here that you love. I’d love to know what you think, so please do be sure to leave a comment below.

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Source: http://dribbble.com/shots/1375719-ICON-Real-Estate-App-Etagi

02-app

Source: http://dribbble.com/shots/1379640-Camera-App-Icon

03-app

Source: http://dribbble.com/shots/1350588-Pencil-app-icon

04-app

Source: http://dribbble.com/shots/1366476-Epiclist-iOS-icon

05-app

Source: http://dribbble.com/shots/1355973-Drop-Ios

06-app

Source: http://dribbble.com/shots/1354776-Cleaner-Icon

07-app

Source: http://dribbble.com/shots/1361891-Xnphoto

08-app

Source: http://dribbble.com/shots/1343908-Wood-Chat

09-app

Source: http://dribbble.com/shots/1371619-Redeem-App-Icon

10-app

Source: http://dribbble.com/shots/1376544-Website-iOS-Icon

11-app

Source: http://dribbble.com/shots/1368848-Applisky-Icon

12-app

Source: http://dribbble.com/shots/1375551-Mug-iOS-Icon

13-app

Source: http://dribbble.com/shots/1317031-Watching-you

14-app

Source: http://dribbble.com/shots/1332621-ReadGloss-iPhone-App-Icon

15-app

Source: http://dribbble.com/shots/1357283-Speed-Limit-Radar

16-app

Source: http://dribbble.com/shots/1345574-Sound-Circle-Icon

17-app

Source: http://dribbble.com/shots/1318983-Mutual-Icon

18-app

Source: http://dribbble.com/shots/1355050-CoinFeed

19-app

Source: http://dribbble.com/shots/1352116-Temp-Clock-Icon

20-app

Source: http://dribbble.com/shots/1336311-Book-Tracker

Author: Ricardo Nunes
Original source: twoimpulse.com/zenith/design/collection-beautiful-app-icons

 


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Logo design|The Beatles’ drop-T logo

Although it was never shown on The Beatles’ original UK albums, The Beatles’ famous ‘drop-T’ logo was a familiar sight throughout the group’s early years.

It adorned Ringo Starr’s drum kit from 1963, has since endured as The Beatles’ official marque, and was registered as a trademark by Apple Corps in the 1990s. But how did it come about?

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Ivor Arbiter was born in Balham, south London, in 1929. He repaired saxophones, worked as a part time drummer, and in the late 1950s opened the specialist music shop Drum City on Shaftesbury Avenue. It was the first drums-only store in London.

The store, modelled on the US idea of an outlet just for drums, became a popular destination for jazz drummers. He also opened Sound City, a guitar shop where The Beatles bought much of their equipment from 1963.

The drop-T logo came about almost by accident. In April 1963 Ringo and Brian Epstein entered Drum City to find a replacement for Starr’s Premier kit.

I had a phone call from the shop to say that someone called Brian Epstein was there with a drummer. Here was this drummer, Ringo, Schmingo, whatever his name was. At that time I certainly hadn’t heard of the Beatles. Every band was going to be big in those days!

Ivor Arbiter

At first they asked for an all-black kit, but Ringo changed his mind after seeing a swatch of Ludwig’s new oyster black pearl finish on Arbiter’s desk. When told that it was only available on Ludwig drums, his mind was made up. “That’s what I want,” he told Arbiter, who fortunately had a £238 Ludwig Downbeat kit with the finish in stock.

Epstein didn’t want to pay for the drums, but Arbiter refused to let him have them for nothing. They negotiated, and eventually Arbiter agreed to trade the drums in return for his battered old Premier kit.

Arbiter told Epstein he wanted Ludwig’s name to appear on the bass drum head, as he’d recently begun a distribution deal with the company. Epstein agreed, but asked for The Beatles’ name on it too.

On the spot Arbiter designed the famous drop-T logo, hastily sketched onto a scrap of paper. The capital B and dropped T were to emphasise the word ‘beat’. Drum City was paid £5 for arranging the artwork, which was painted onto the drum head by Eddie Stokes, a local sign writer.

On Sunday May 12 1963 Ringo took delivery of his new Ludwig kit. The drums, along with new Paiste cymbals, were driven up by Drum City’s Gerry Evans, who delivered them to the Alpha Television Studios in Birmingham, where The Beatles were appearing on Thank Your Lucky Stars.

The kit had a 20 inch bass drum, 12×8 tom-tom, 14×14 floor tom, and a non-standard Ludwig Jazz Festival wooden snare.

I took his old Premier drum kit from him and brought it back to the store. We renovated it in our workshop, and then sold it. I ripped off the bit of material from the bass drum head where he’d handwritten the Beatles’ name and threw it away. It was a terrible drum kit. It wasn’t old: he’d only had it six months or a year. But it was a brown finish, one of the worst finishes that Premier ever did… I don’t know why he got it in the first place, really. No wonder he wanted to change it. Anyway, we cleaned it up and sold it off the same week – and very, very cheaply. It would most likely be a collector’s item if we still had it today.

Gerry Evans
Beatles Gear, Andy Babiu

By the end of 1963 the Ludwig sticker on the bass head was flaking away from all the carrying from show to show. It was taken back to Drum City, where Stokes repainted the Ludwig logo, slightly larger than before.

This original drum head was last seen in public at The Beatles’ run of appearances at Paris’ Olympia Theatre, which ended on 4 February 1964. Ringo Starr is rumoured to still own the original drum head, along with the Ludwig kit.

DROP-T DRUM HEAD NUMBER TWO

Starr used seven different drop-T bass drum heads between 1963 and 1967, each with a slightly different logo.

Following Ivor Arbiter’s original, the second drop-T head is commonly known as the Sullivan Head, as it was the one used during The Beatles’ first appearance on The Ed Sullivan Show on 9 February 1964.

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In January 1964, while The Beatles were preparing for their first US trip, Ivor Arbiter was asked to prepare a second bass drum head. Once again Eddie Stokes painted the logo, this time onto a 20″ Remo Weather King skin.

Drum City was an authorised dealer of Remo heads, whose distinctive logo was a small crown situated at the top of the head near the rim.

For the second head, Stokes painted The Beatles’ logo much larger, spanning the entire skin from edge to edge. A wider typeface was also used.

Rather than shipping Starr’s drums to America, a new drum kit was purchased for him to play there; only the snare and cymbals were brought over, as well as head number two. Manny’s Music Store in Manhattan delivered the kit, to which the head was attached, just before the taping of their historic appearances for Ed Sullivan.

The second skin was used throughout The Beatles’ first US tour, including three Ed Sullivan shoots, two Carnegie Hall concerts and their live US début at the Washington Coliseum. During the tour a scratch, most likely caused by a hi-hat cymbal being packed in the same case, ran from the letter B through to the A.

The new drums were sent to EMI Studios in Abbey Road after the first US tour. The head was not seen again in public until it was auctioned at Sotheby’s in London 1984. It was sold to George Wilkins, an Australian restaurateur, before being sold once more 10 years later at Sotheby’s, where it was purchased by collector Russ Lease.

DROP-T DRUM HEAD NUMBER THREE

The Beatles began recording and filming A Hard Day’s Night almost immediately after returning from America. It was decided that a brand new bass drum head would be needed for their film début.

Once again a Remo Weather Master was chosen, onto which a logo was hand-painted by Eddie Stokes. This time the group’s name was narrower than on the Ed Sullivan head. The Ludwig logo, too, was different: the L extended below the subsequent letters.

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This third head was used throughout filming, and was used during The Beatles’ appearance at the New Musical Express Annual Poll Winners’ All-Star Concert on 26 April 1964.

Afterwards it was seen just once more in public, during the You’re Going To Lose That Girl recording studio sequence in the Help! film. The scene was filmed on 30 April 1965.

Head number three has never appeared at auction, suggesting that, after the kit was sawn around by Clang in the film, it was never recovered from the store room under the studio floor.

DROP-T DRUM HEAD NUMBER FOUR

On the morning of 31 May 1964, prior to a live appearance at the Prince of Wales Theatre in London, Ringo Starr took delivery of a new Ludwig kit, which included his first 22″ bass drum. A new head was therefore required, and Eddie Stokes once again painted the group’s logo onto a Remo Weather King.

This time around, Stokes’ lettering was similar to that on the original head. The Ludwig logo was also painted on.

drop-t-logo-04

The drums and head were used exclusively for all The Beatles’ appearances from 31 May 1964 through to 1 August 1965, when they appeared on the Blackpool Night Out television show. Aside from the studio scene in Help!, Starr never again went back to his two 20″ kits.

DROP-T DRUM HEAD NUMBER FIVE

In August 1965 The Beatles returned to New York for the start of their US tour. Ringo Starr unveiled his fourth and final black pearl Ludwig drum kit, along with a fifth head – a 22″ Remo Weather Master.

This time a Ludwig sticker was used instead of a painted logo. It was placed at a slight angle, with the letters on the right slightly higher than those on the left. The Beatles’ logo featured a fatter typeface than on previous versions.

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The fifth head first appeared in public on 14 August 1965, the day before their triumphant first concert at New York’s Shea Stadium. The Beatles recorded their fourth Ed Sullivan Show appearance in Manhattan, though the recording wasn’t screened until 12 September.

The kit and head were used throughout the group’s 1965 US tour.

DROP-T DRUM HEAD NUMBER SIX

The Music Of Lennon & McCartney was a UK TV special filmed on 1 and 2 November 1965. As The Beatles were in the middle of recording Rubber Soul at the time, Ringo Starr used his first 22″ Ludwig kit, along with a sixth drop-T logo.

drop-t-logo-06

This logo was used on every live and film appearance up until Magical Mystery Tour in 1967. It was also used during the Sgt Pepper sessions.

The sixth skin was used during the rehearsals for Our World, the worldwide satellite link-up for which The Beatles wrote and performed All You Need Is Love. However, prior to the live transmission, the drum head was replaced by the orange and red skin later seen in the Magical Mystery Tour film.

The logo returned for the Hello, Goodbye promo film, although it hasn’t been seen since the footage was shot at the Savile Theatre, London, on 10 November 1967. It disappeared after being stored in an annexe to Abbey Road’s studio three in early 1968.

Ringo’s drum with the Beatles skin on it was left in there, and I remember thinking how attractive to a collector that particular item would be. Strangely enough – and I plead not guilty on this – we came in one day and someone had neatly trimmed the skin out of the drum frame, So someone somewhere has got the original Beatles skin that came out of Starr’s drum kit. After that they used the red-painted skin with ‘Love’ in yellow, rather than bother to get another Beatles skin, because they obviously weren’t going to be appearing on stage any more.

Brian Gibson, studio engineer
Beatles Gear, Andy Babiuk

DROP-T DRUM HEAD NUMBER SEVEN

The final drop-T logo was seen in public very briefly, at the beginning of the Let It Be film, being carried by Mal Evans. The head – again, a 22″ Remo Weather Master, with Ludwig sticker – was intended for Ringo Starr’s maple-finish Hollywood drum kit used during the shoot in January 1969.

drop-t-logo-07_01-580x423

However, it was unusual at the time for a front head to be used on Starr’s bass drum in the studio, to give greater flexibility in recording and dampening. As a result, the head was never attached to the drum, nor was it played by Starr.

The Let It Be head was put up for auction in September 1988 by George Peckham of The Fourmost, who had worked for Apple in 1969. Peckham claimed that John Lennon had given him the item. However, it failed to reach its reserve price and remained unsold.

The head was eventually sold by Sotheby’s in August 1992 to an anonymous bidder. It is believed to have remained in private ownership.

drop-t-logo-07_03

Original Source: beatlesbible.com/features/drop-t-logo


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Sandy officials use Web resources to keep residents up to date

Enhance The Experience: Fundamental to Branding

At RED, we know that delivering a one-of-a-kind engaging experience is one way to reach customers. But we’ve seen time and again that creating an emotionally-valued experience within them gives us a deeper view into the mindset of the customer. This view reveals the hidden behavioral triggers that motivate their decision making.

See what Nicole Martin, Communications Director for Sandy City, has to say about RED.

It is always a challenge to keep an ever-growing community aware and involved in the goings-on of their city. In the summer of 2013, RED helped Sandy City build a new website that did just that.

SANDY — Decisions being made in the Legislature will impact some laws more than others, and Sandy residents can find out that information on a new website.

Sandy_City_Gov_Building

SANDY — Decisions being made in the Legislature will impact some laws more than others, and Sandy residents can find out that information on a new website.As Sandy’s population continues to get bigger, communications between residents and the city government sometimes gets smaller.”It’s so difficult to get information out and receive information back from your citizens. You really work hard at it,” Sandy Mayor Tom Dolan said.Dolan has seen plenty of City Council meetings where there were more councilmen than residents. And yet tough decisions still have to be made.”The biggest failure is communications,” said Nicole Martin, Sandy spokeswoman. “If you’re not communicating, then your residents have no idea what you’re doing.”Although communications with residents is something cities everywhere have a difficult time with, Sandy is trying something not many have tried before.”What’s different about Sandy now is what we call our online information dashboard,” Martin said.

sandy_now

Sandynow.com is a website. Most cities have websites, Twitter and Facebook pages, as well as old-fashioned newsletters to communicate with residents.But Sandy is bringing all that together with constant updates to let residents know what’s going on. The city is following the legislative session this month to post information affecting its residents.”With today’s technology, it’s not enough for cities to kind of passively communicate and hope their residents are informed,” Martin said.Dolan remembers scrolling through city information on a cable-access TV channel years ago and called the experience “the most boring thing in the world.”He’s amazed at how far technology has come and how it’s so crucial for cities to use it to make sure residents are informed.”It’s getting much better because people are more technologically advanced and this is the way they communicate,” Dolan said.Dolan understands not everyone has the Internet and said newsletters and announcements will still be mailed to residents.

By Alex Cabrero                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   ksl.com/?nid=148&sid=28541824#uKYMlX4fL2TVj5jr.99


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iPhone 6 Concept Design By Nikola Cirkuvic

After iPhone 5s, the next obvious version of the line of iPhone is iPhone 6. What is not so clear is what it will look like. So far the iPhone had stayed true to its design, at best ‘growing’ taller and slimmer. But you haven’t seen the iPhone like this.

This is an iPhone 6 concept design created by Nikola Cirkuvic, a mechanical engineering student from Serbia. Aside from a “thin-ness” of 5.3 mm, no other dimensions were released by the creator. In the design, he has removed the bezel from both sides, giving the iPhone a much larger screen but not succumbing to the curve smartphone designs LG and Samsung are adopting.

By

iphone 6

This concept design only depicted the iPhone 6 in silver and space gray with a not-as-prominent Touch ID sensor but from some angles, you can see similarities of this design with the iPad mini and the newly released iPad Air. The lack of icons also made the design timeless, allowing you to focus on the hardware and not let the software lock it into a timeline. Do you like it or hate it? Sound off in the comments.

Recommended Reading: 30 Stunning Apple Concept Designs

iphone 6

iphone 6

iphone 6

iphone 6

iphone 6